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Still way too wet to work on. Let it stay uncovered all day while I started a smaller version as demo for my sculpture class. Monday it should be perfect.

Things went in a totally unexpected direction today- I thought I knew what I was building, silly me. Ultimately had to stop because clay was too soft to add any more. Very  hard for me to be patient. I should be working on more than one piece at a time- maybe next week.

I started this piece today. It will, I think, be a lot more humorous than my larger more recent sculptures, but summer seems a good time to lighten things up a little. As you can see I have only the basic feet and one hand made. It will be fun to document this as it develops.

Enough said, here are the first two pics.

 

 

November 9 and 10- Workshop with Jack Troy

Things Jack taught us:

When we throw we are using , both sides of our brain.

We open using the right side of our brain, our outside hand uses the left.

Throwing rings on a finished piece remind us that the cup is made out of a material that once was plastic.

 

 

November 9 and 10- Workshop with Jack Troy

Things Jack taught us:

When we throw we are using , both sides of our brain. We open using the right side of our brain, our outside hand uses the left.

Throwing rings on a finished piece remind us that the cup is made out of a material that once was plastic.

Having a studio in building continually visited by the public continues to push me to find new avenues of verbal expression about my work. It it imperative that my responses to peoples queries be genuine, that I am able to decide how much information any given individual might actually want, and thus reply accordingly. This has, over time, led to a lot of soul searching and research some scholarly, other more anecdotal. 

John Yeh and I installed my show "Into the Forest Primeval" at Montpelier yesterday. It is the culmination of one years work, and a very different show from previous ones.

There are twenty one pieces in all. Nine of them are free standing sculptures, not nearly as whimsical as previous work. People have commented that they are very confrontational, and I have to agree. I guess as I get old I have less patience for soft-pedalling, less time for worrying about the viewers reaction. It is what it is, they are what they are.

So, I am not an NCECA virgin anymore.  What a great time! It was worth every penny, every minute I have come back with my brain ready to explode from everything I saw and heard, and,there was one over-arching personal theme to my experience. It was words: what are they for, how are they pertinent to me as an artist, are they even necessary?

I was talking today with my friend Jim. We have known each other for about 45 years, and he has witnessed my growth both personally and as an artist. While we were talking, he was looking at this website, and eventually read the blog entries. This of course led to conversation about the artist as archeologist, the philosophy I have  most recently been exploring, and how that approach resonates with me.

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